Boogaloo Investigators – Dynamighty!

folder.jpg

Formed in late 2002, The Boogaloo Investigators blasted out of the Glasgow funk scene with aplomb. With influences ranging from American rhythm & blues of the 50’s & 60’s and British mod soul to hammond led soul, jazz and funk, it wasn’t long before the 5 piece were gaining support from DJs such as Keb Darge, Eddie Piller, Mr Scruff and Quantic.

Jimi Hendrix & The Isley Brothers – In The Beginning

Front.jpg

These are the first offerings from the Isley Brothers’ T-Neck record label, and many consider special because Jimi Hendrix played lead guitar on them. However, these tracks bombed as singles. “Testify” is noisy and congested, too much is going on. Hendrix’s guitar is prominent, and identifies him as conclusively as a DNA sample. The Isleys imitate popular singers Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles, and James Brown on “Testify,” but the imitations are weak and sound like clones of each other. “Move Over and Let Me Dance” has some of “Testify”‘s problems but works a little better, it has a danceable groove and a much better hook. The only soft selection is “The Last Girl,” which has an airy sound, and features a rare laid-back vocal from Ron Isley during this phase of his career. Hendrix fans will love this, but fans of the Isleys’ later stuff will not be impressed.

Eric Burdon & The Animals – Love Is

Eric Burdon & The Animals - Love Is (1994) f.jpg

Love Is is a double album by Eric Burdon and The Animals which was released in 1968 in both the United Kingdom and United States. It was the last album released before The Animals’ second dissolution in 1969. An edited version of the track “Ring of Fire” was released as a single and peaked at No. 35 in the UK pop charts, breaking the top 40 in Germany, Holland, and Australia as well.
Aside from the self-penned “I’m Dying (or am I?)”, the album consists entirely of cover songs with extended arrangements by the Animals and sometimes even additional lyrics and musical sections. The entire Side D is occupied by a medley of songs originally by Dantalian’s Chariot, a former group of band members Zoot Money and Andy Summers. Dantalian’s Chariot archivists have been unable to locate a recording of “Gemini”, and it is possible that Eric Burdon and the Animals were the first to actually record the song.
This album captured the only studio work of guitarist Andy Summers with the group. The recording of Traffic’s “Coloured Rain” includes a guitar solo by Summers which runs a full 4 minutes and 15 seconds. To ensure he ended at the right place, Zoot Money kept count throughout the solo and gave him the cue out at bar 189

Ronnie Earl & the Broadcasters – Blues and Forgiveness

front.jpg

Ronnie Earl and his band recorded “live in concert” during their European tour ’93. High-energy blues at its best. If you’ve seen him ‘live’ you know what I am talking about.
Especially for the lovers of straight blues guitar, this album will be more than a welcomed addition to their Ronnie Earl collection.
I always thought that he was best in a live situation, on stage, facing a supportive audience. We tried to capture that special feel, and the high energy of a Ronnie Earl performance.
A treat for all lovers of hard-drivin’ guitar blues, performed by one of the greatest guitar players on planet earth.

Cyril Nevvile – Magic Honey

COVER.jpg

Cyril Neville’s Magic Honey is an album dripping with blues as sweet as the title suggests. Formerly a vocalist for The Neville Brothers, The Meters, and currently for Royal Southern Brotherhood, Cyril Neville croons sweet blues on Magic Honey alongside guitarist Cranston Clements, drummer “Mean” Willie Green, Bassist Carl Dufrene, and keyboardist Norman Caesar. Additionally, Magic Honey features guest appearances by pianist Allen Toussaint, organist Dr. John, guitarist Walter Trout, and Neville’s Royal Southern Brotherhood bandmate and guitarist, Mike Zito.

 

Dave Alvin – Eleven Eleven

Front.jpg

Dave Alvin turns it up. The intensity, the focus, the volume. On Alvin’s new album Eleven Eleven, the man who many credit with pioneering what has come to be known as ‘roots rock,’ revisits the burning, guitar-centered blues rock that initially defined his career along with his band The Blasters in the late 1970s. After The Blasters, Alvin explored the path of American folk music, a road that led to classic albums and Grammy wins (for his album Public Domain: Songs from the Wild Land), establishing him as one of America’s most distinguished songwriters and California’s de facto roots music ambassador. Fast forward to Eleven Eleven and Dave is ready to raise the stakes again, calling on some Blasters including his brother Phil, with whom he duets for the first time ever on record. The inaugurals continue with Dave writing all the songs while on the road touring, a first for the seasoned performer. The new method clearly sparked new ideas for Alvin, with the blistering guitar runs and Bo Diddley beat of ”Run Conejo Run” sidling up alongside the gentle finger-picking of the tremolo-soaked ”No Worries Mija.” Eleven Eleven also features ”Harlan County Line,” the song featured, along with an Alvin cameo as himself, in FX original series Justified and Alvin’s highest and fastest-selling digital single ever.