Jimi Hendrix – Blues

front

While Jimi Hendrix remains most famous for his hard rock and psychedelic innovations, more than a third of his recordings were blues-oriented. This CD contains 11 blues originals and covers, eight of which were previously unreleased. Recorded between 1966 and 1970, they feature the master guitarist stretching the boundaries of electric blues in both live and studio settings. Besides several Hendrix blues-based originals, it includes covers of Albert King and Muddy Waters classics, as well as a 1967 acoustic version of his composition “Hear My Train a Comin’.”

Advertisements

Stevie Ray Vaughan – Live in Tokyo

front

This is a live recording of Stevie Ray Vaughan’s first concert in Japan in 1985, accompanied by longtime stalwarts Double Trouble. He had by that time risen above his personal demons and was completely concentrated on his music. The audience was swept off their feet with his amazing guitar fireworks. The show included versions of ‘Texas Flood’, ‘Voodoo Chile’, ‘Love Struck Baby’, ‘Cold Shot’ and others.

Charles Kynard -Reelin’ With The Feelin

front

Although Charles Kynard led a date for Pacific Jazz in the early ’60s and five albums for Prestige from 1968-1970, he never really became famous. A fine organist in the style of Jimmy Smith, Kynard could always groove and chug along with the best of them. This Prestige date (reissued on an LP in the Original Jazz Classics series but not yet on CD) matches Kynard with an interesting cast of players: tenor saxophonist Wilton Felder (of the Jazz Crusaders), guitarist Joe Pass (a few years before he became famous for his Pablo recordings), electric bassist Carol Kaye, and drummer Paul Humphrey. The music is quite groove-oriented and chiefly of interest for the contrasting solos of Kynard, Felder, and Pass. [The entire album has been combined with another 1969 session, The Soul Brotherhood, on Prestige’s 2001 CD reissue The Soul Brotherhood.]

Ginger Baker – In Concert

front small

Peter Edward “Ginger” Baker (born 19 August 1939 in Lewisham, South London) is an English drummer, best known for his work with Cream and Blind Faith. He is also known for his numerous associations with World music, mainly the use of African influences. He has also had other collaborations such as with Gary Moore, Hawkwind and Public Image Ltd.
Baker’s drumming attracted attention for its flamboyance, showmanship and his use of two bass drums instead of the conventional single bass kick drum (following a similar set-up used by Louie Bellson during his days with Duke Ellington). Although a firmly established rock drummer and praised as “Rock’s first superstar drummer”, he prefers being called a jazz drummer. Baker’s influence has extended to drummers of both genres, including Billy Cobham, Peter Criss, Bill Ward, Ian Paice, Nick Mason, and John Bonham. AllMusic has described him as “the most influential percussionist of the 1960s” and stated that “virtually every drummer of every heavy metal band that has followed since that time has sought to emulate some aspect of Baker’s playing.”
While at times performing in a similar way to Keith Moon from The Who, Baker also employs a more restrained style influenced by the British jazz groups he heard during the late 1950s and early 1960s. In his early days as a drummer, he performed lengthy drum solos, the best known being the five-minute drum solo “Toad” from Cream’s debut album Fresh Cream (1966). He is also noted for using a variety of other percussion instruments and for his application of African rhythms. He would often emphasize the flam, a drum rudiment in which both sticks attack the drumhead at almost the same time, giving a heavy thunderous sound.
This is a very rare album recorded live in London in 1982 , ripped from vinyl.
Many thanks to our friend Filopimin for giving it to Granazi…

Duke Robillard – Stomp The Blues Tonight

front

Duke Robillard celebrates his 16th release for Stony Plain Records by taking a step back. Reuniting with several of his Roomful of Blues bandmates (Doug James, Rich Lataille, and Al Basile) as well as incorporating some new faces (singer Sunny Crownover), Robillard revisits the ’40s and ’50s blues and R&B that has been Roomful of Blues’ trademark for over 40 years on Stomp! The Blues Tonight. In addition to the powerful horn section, Robillard has assembled a top notch rhythm section (Marty Ballou and Jon Ross on bass, Mark Teixeira on drums) and a set list that includes a perfect blend of cover tunes and originals.
Robillard’s guitar work is as impressive as ever, as are his vocals. The band provides excellent support (Bruce Bears’ piano is a highlight) throughout. Any new Duke Robillard release is a guaranteed pleasure from start to finish, and Stomp! The Blues Tonight ranks up there with his best recordings.

Darondo – Let my people go

front

You might have heard Darondo’s irresistable soul nugget “Didn’t I” – as the opening cut on the Gilles Peterson Digs America compilation.He opened-up for James Brown and lived a colorful lifestyle hanging with folks like the notorious Fillmore Slim. Take a listen to these tracks, released for the first time together on an album, and you may agree that he could have been the next Al Green or Sly Stone. But about 25 years ago Darondo disappeared. Let My People Go is nine tracks long, compiling the three super-rare 7″ singles that comprised Darondo’s musical career and includes three previously unreleased tracks recently found on a reel of demos. Mixing low-rider soul with blues and r’n’b, he delivered in a variety of styles. From the socially-charged title track to the sexually-driven funk of “Legs” Darondo’s raw soul sound is turning heads worldwide.