Beatlejam – Live At The Webster Theater

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UK pressing of this live album from the jam band supergroup consisting of Matt Abs (Govt Mule), Berry Oakley (Allman Brothers), Vince Welnick (Grateful Dead), Slick Aguilar (Jefferson Starship) and Johnny Need (Govt Mule, Allman Brothers, Lonny Mack). Beatlejam are a sort of spin off from the successful US jam band Blue Floyd only this time its Beatles songs rather than the Pink Floyd, given the unique jam spin.

Live at the Webster Theater, Hartford, Ct, 2002

Chingon – Mexican Spaghetti Western

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Chingon is a Mexican rock band based in Austin, Texas. Their sound is heavily influenced by mariachi, ranchera, and Texan rock ‘n roll music.
Chingon was formed by film director Robert Rodriguez to record songs for his 2003 film Once Upon a Time in Mexico. They contributed on Mexico and Mariachis, a compilation album to Rodriguez’ Mariachi Trilogy, and released their debut album, Mexican Spaghetti Western, in 2004. The band’s name comes from a Mexican slang term, chingon, loosely but closely enough meaning “badass” and/or “awesome”.
Chingon also contributed the song “Malaguena Salerosa” to Quentin Tarantino’s Kill Bill Vol. 2 — which Rodriguez scored — and a live performance by the band was included on the film’s DVD release. They also contributed to the soundtrack for his next film, a collaboration with Tarantino, Grindhouse, doing a cover of the film’s opening theme, re-titling it “Cherry’s Dance of Death”. Rodriguez plays guitar in the band.

Harvey Mandel – The Mercury Years

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You never forget your first love, and if you’re a musician, you hope the public never forgets your first recordings. It’s been years since Harvey Mandel’s initial titles as a frontman –1968’s Christo Redentor and ’69’s Righteous and Games Guitars Play–were available, though they’re treasured by guitar devotees. Now, they’re back, thanks to this revelatory two-disc. The trio of titles, which originally came out on the Philips label, are ambitious, mostly instrumental projects that match the future Canned Heat member and Rolling Stone session man with strings, brass, and an eclectic assortment of songs and sidemen.

 

Jimi Hendrix & The Isley Brothers – In The Beginning

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These are the first offerings from the Isley Brothers’ T-Neck record label, and many consider special because Jimi Hendrix played lead guitar on them. However, these tracks bombed as singles. “Testify” is noisy and congested, too much is going on. Hendrix’s guitar is prominent, and identifies him as conclusively as a DNA sample. The Isleys imitate popular singers Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles, and James Brown on “Testify,” but the imitations are weak and sound like clones of each other. “Move Over and Let Me Dance” has some of “Testify”‘s problems but works a little better, it has a danceable groove and a much better hook. The only soft selection is “The Last Girl,” which has an airy sound, and features a rare laid-back vocal from Ron Isley during this phase of his career. Hendrix fans will love this, but fans of the Isleys’ later stuff will not be impressed.

Boz Scaggs – Boz Scaggs

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In 1969, Boz Scaggs debut release on Atlantic Records was a stunning classic recording that has earned its place in the history of rock, blues and popular music. Celebrating its four decade birthday, Friday Music has located the original session tapes, which havent been available since the early seventies, and have spared no expense with the mastering process to deliver what we feel is the definitive audiophile reissue of the year! The nine songs that make this incredible album such a winner has a lot to do with the musicianship, writing skills, and the great voice of Boz Scaggs . Fans remember exciting blues oriented tracks like Im Easy and I’ll Be Long Gone as some of the most important songs of this much loved platter. With the famous Muscle Shoals studio sound, along with some of the finest musicians in the business, Boz and company delivered nine tracks of whack, that have stood the test of time, including one of his most famous works Loan Me A Dime, which hands down opened the doors for a lot of the cross over blues music that is being recorded today. This much emulated and loved work as well as the other great songs from the album feature the sorely missed guitar styling of the late Duane Allman. For the first edition run of this masterwork, Friday Music is including a textured gatefold cover, along with the original graphics, poly lined protective album sleeve, and poly vinyl cover for the album cover.

Colosseum – An Introduction To…Colosseum

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This is genuine mind-expanding music that doesn’t quit, and even better yet, it expands the perceptions and the range of thought in several dimensions at once — something nearly unthinkable to consider when listening to any ’60s or early-’70s music in the 21st century. And the whole context is totally unexpected. Who would ever imagine that, when Alexis Korner and Cyril Davies formed Blues Incorporated in 1962, someday the group would spawn a virtuoso prog rock band like Colosseum, whose work owed so much to those blues roots? That’s the first thought likely to flash through your head when listening to the first of a brace of Dick Heckstall-Smith saxophone solos, or the equivalent moments by James Litherland or Dave Clempson on guitar, on An Introduction to Colosseum. The 72-minute compilation carries listeners across the group’s four albums and sounds ranging from soulful, jazz-influenced instrumentals to the funkier pieces on their second and third albums, as well as their magnum opus as a progressive rock outfit, “Valentyne Suite.” You’ll probably be struck instantly by the amazing array of bold (yet not flashy) virtuosity in jazz, soul, blues, hard rock, and elements of classical that are on display, and instantly perceive the link with the early-’60s British blues embodied by Korner, Davies, Heckstall-Smith, et al. Colosseum represented a solution to a problem that a lot of listeners, writers, and music scholars had given up on as hopeless (and not necessarily worth reviving), revealing how blues could make the leap to larger musical contexts. When Chess Records tried it with Rotary Connection or those psychedelic Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf albums, or the Rolling Stones did Their Satanic Majesties Request, it seemed as though blues-rock had run into a dead end in trying to merge with larger musical forms, but the range of material here — very obviously connected to the same source from whence the Stones sprang — proves that there was a way to make that leap without losing the appeal of the original source. The two live cuts at the end of the disc (including Jack Bruce’s “Rope Ladder to the Moon”) from the group’s concert album on the Bronze label also show how good this group could sound on-stage — a little loud at times, but still cohesive and intense. As a single-CD anthology, it’s difficult to imagine too many releases outdoing this one, and as it promises an “introduction” to the group, its reach never exceeds its grasp or its ambitions

 

Willy Deville – Come A Little Bit Closer – The Best Of Willy Deville Live

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Willy DeVille was one of the finest American songwriters of his generation. Drawing influences from Blues, Rock, Cajun, Latin, Country and more he created a rich blend of music that acknowledged its roots but was uniquely DeVille. He was also a consummate live performer with a style, charisma and presence that few could match. This new compilation brings together these two elements to give you “Come A Little Bit Closer – The Best Of Willy DeVille Live”. Tracks are taken from performances ranging from Amsterdam in 1977, through concerts at Nijmegen and Montreux in the 80s and 90s and into the 21st century with concerts from Berlin and back to Amsterdam in 2005.